© Ilvy Njiokiktjien, VII Photo Agency

© Ilvy Njiokiktjien, VII Photo Agency

South Africa’s Born Free generation

Editorial published by BJP-online, 07 June 2019
Twenty five years have passed since Nelson Mandela became president and apartheid was officially abolished. Ilvy Njiokiktjien’s decade-long project documents the opportunities and challenges faced by the children of the “rainbow nation”
Up until the early 1990s, the rights of people in South Africa was determined by the colour of their skin. Cities were segregated grids, where “Blacks” and “Coloureds” were required to carry legal documentation in “White” areas. Schools, workplaces and public toilets were also divided by race.
Twenty five years have passed since Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as the first black president of South Africa on 10 May 1994, and since apartheid was officially abolished. 
The first children born during this revolutionary period, known as the born-frees, are now coming-of-age. These young adults have been raised freely to live wherever and love whoever they wanted; they were the shining beacons of Mandela’s dreams of a “rainbow nation”.
But today, as the country votes for their sixth president since Mandela, it has become apparent that crime, poverty and corruption are still keeping many of the born-frees captive.

This is an excerpt from an article published by, and on, BJP-online. Read the full article on British Journal of Photography.

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